VIPC&S
Virginians Improving Patient Care and Safety

-Introduction
-Press Releases
-Disclaimer
  

Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield

ANTHEM BLUE CROSS 
AND BLUE SHIELD

BON SECOURS RICHMOND HEALTH SYSTEM

CARILION HEALTH SYSTEM

CARDINAL HEALTH

EASTERN VIRGINIA MEDICAL SCHOOL

GENERAL ELECTRIC (GE)

HAMPTON ROADS HEALTH COALITION

HCA HOSPITALS — RICHMOND MARKET

INOVA HEALTH SYSTEMS

KAISER-PERMANENTE, MID-ATLANTIC

MEDICAL REENGINEERING CONSULTANTS, INC.

MEDICAL SOCIETY OF VIRGINIA

MEDICORP HEALTH SYSTEM

MIDATLANTIC MEDICAL SERVICES

OLD DOMINION MEDICAL SOCIETY

QUALCHOICE OF VIRGINIA

RICHMOND ACADEMY OF MEDICINE

ROCKINGHAM MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

SENTARA HEALTHCARE

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA HEALTH SYSTEM

VIRGINIA ACADEMY OF FAMILY PHYSICIANS

VIRGINIA ASSOCIATION OF CHAIN DRUG STORES

VIRGINIA ASSOCIATION OF DURABLE MEDICAL EQUIPMENT COMPANIES

VIRGINIA ASSOCIATION OF HEALTH PLANS

VIRGINIA ASSOCIATION FOR HEALTHCARE QUALITY

VIRGINIA CHAPTER, AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR HEALTHCARE RISK MANAGEMENT

VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY HEALTH SYSTEMS

VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS

VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL ASSISTANCE SERVICES

VIRGINIA HEALTH CARE ASSOCIATION

VIRGINIA HEALTH INFORMATION

VIRGINIA HEALTH QUALITY CENTER

VIRGINIA HOSPITAL & HEALTHCARE ASSOCIATION

VIRGINIA NURSES ASSOCIATION

VIRGINIA ORGANIZATION OF NURSE EXECUTIVES

VIRGINIA PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION

VIRGINIA PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION

VIRGINIA SOCIETY OF HEALTH-SYSTEM PHARMACISTS

VIRGINIA SOCIETY OF OPHTHALMOLOGY

WEST VIRGINIA MEDICAL INSTITUTE

 

ABOUT VIPC&S
1200 E. Clay Street • Richmond, VA 23219 • (804) 643-6631  Phone (804) 788-9987  Fax •  e-mail

Virginians Improving Patient Care and Safety (VIPC&S) Mission:

To identify and promote strategies to improve patient care and safety with the citizens of the Commonwealth of Virginia through:

  1. Building awareness
  2. Education
  3. Legislation
  4. Endorsement, support and advocacy

Virginians Improving Patient Care and Safety (VIPC&S) Vision:

To be a leader as a statewide patient safety coalition that encourages and supports a culture of health care safety by virtue of its:

  1. Diverse representation and independence
  2. Values driven ideas and approaches
  3. Commitment to knowledge sharing
  4. Confidence in Virginia’s health care system responsiveness and ability to improve health care quality

Virginians Improving Patient Care and Safety (VIPC&S) Core Principles for Addressing the Institute of Medicine’s Report on Medical Errors
Adopted June 13, 2000

VIPC&S supports systematic efforts to continuously improve quality of care and patient safety through:

  • collaborative efforts between consumers and other purchasers, providers, health plans, regulators, accrediting bodies, and others;
  • the dissemination and implementation of best practices; and
  • education and training guided by appropriate data collection and analysis.

VIPC&S concurs with the basic message of the IOM report: we can and must do more to improve patient safety by encouraging learning from mistakes.

VIPC&S recognizes that "To Err is Human." Competent professionals can make mistakes. Most adverse events have multiple underlying causes and more attention needs to be paid to those underlying causes.

VIPC&S believes that sharing knowledge about errors in a non-punitive way is essential for improving patient safety. We support confidential, non-punitive safety reporting systems because this approach has been proven to be effective in healthcare and other industries and we believe that the interest of the public can best be served by adopting the most effective methods available to improve patient safety.

VIPC&S believes that any reporting system to improve patient safety should have the following attributes:

  • Strict confidentiality of individual reports is maintained and protections are in place to insure that reporting does not lead to liability exposure.
  • Reports are used for learning and improvement rather than punishment.
  • Reports are made to a non-regulatory, independent organization or organizations with access to expertise in patient safety and systems improvement.
  • Adequate resources are provided and feedback mechanisms are implemented to facilitate the exchange of knowledge, encourage learning from reported errors, and lead to the implementation of safe delivery systems that minimize the risk of human and technical error.
  • Periodic reassessment is conducted to insure that the reporting system is meeting its intent and not having undesired consequences.
  • Reporting is neither duplicative nor burdensome.
  • Any aggregate analysis reported to the public should be based on reportable events that are clearly defined, concentrate on long-term or irreversible patient harm, and be coordinated with national efforts to promote consistency with standardized methods of reporting, analysis, and follow-up that emphasize process improvement.

VIPC&S believes the public has a right to expect healthcare organizations and practitioners to have effective patient safety programs.

VIPC&S believes that policy makers and regulators should allow healthcare providers the flexibility to determine the specifics of error reduction programs to best suit local conditions, evolving science, and a focus on systems improvement.

VIPC&S embraces the role of purchasers in evaluating and rewarding those payers and providers who demonstrate a clear commitment to systems, policies and practices that improve healthcare quality and patient safety. Incentives should be developed to encourage collaborative, multidisciplinary approaches among all interested parties.

VIPC&S recognizes that leadership, commitment and the dedication of resources are imperative to reduce medical errors and promote patient safety. VIPC&S recognizes the critical need for new research into causes and means to prevent medical errors.

2004-2006 OFFICERS

PRESIDENT
Sallie Cook, MD (2)
Virginia Health Quality Center

VICE-PRESIDENT
Brooke Taylor (1)
Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield (Founding Organization)

SECRETARY
Doug Sears (1)
Bon Secours Health System, Inc.

TREASURER
Joy Lombard (1)
Virginia Association of Health Plans (Founding Organization)

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
note: officers also serve on the board

Carl Armstrong, MD
Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association (Founding Organization)

Ursula Butts, RN, MSHA (1)
Community Memorial Health Center (Virginia Nurses Association)

Edward G. Koch, MD
Medical Society of Virginia (Founding Organization)

Joe Hilbert
Virginia Department of Health ( Founding Organization)

Charlie Pfister (2)
GE

Doug Sears
Bon Secours

Becky Snead, RPh
Virginia Pharmacists Association ( Founding Organization)

Gary Yates, MD (1)
Sentara

1200 E. Clay Street • Richmond, VA 23219 • e-mail


VIPC&S News and Updates

What you need to know about mercury in fish and seafood

Fish and shellfish are an important part of a healthy diet. Fish and shellfish contain high-quality protein and other essential nutrients that are low in saturated fat and contain fat omega-3. A well-balanced diet that includes a variety of fish and shellfish can contribute to heart health and growth and proper development of children. Therefore, women and young children in particular should include fish or shellfish in their diets because of its many nutritional benefits.

However, nearly all fish and shellfish contain some traces of mercury. For many people, the risk from mercury in fish and shellfish is not a health concern. However, some fish and shellfish contain high levels of mercury that can harm a baby who is not born or may adversely affect the nervous system in developing of a small child. The risks of mercury in fish and shellfish depend on the amount of fish and shellfish that eat and the levels of mercury in fish and shellfish.Therefore, the administration of the food and Drug (Administration FDA) and the Agency for environmental protection (EPA) advise women in fertile age, pregnant women, nursing mothers and young children to avoid some types of fish to eat, and to eat fish and shellfish low in mercury.

By following these three recommendations of best restaurant Granville island for selecting and eating fish or shellfish, women and children will receive the benefits of eating fish and shellfish and can trust that it will have reduced their exposure to the harmful effects of mercury.

  1. Do not eat shark, swordfish, mackerel, or tilefish because they contain high levels of mercury.
  2. You can eat up to 12 ounces (two average meals) a week of a variety of fish or shellfish that are low in mercury.
    • Five of the fish that are eaten more frequently that are low in mercury are shrimp, canned light tuna, salmon, Pollock and catfish.
    • Other fish commonly eaten is the albacore (white) tuna that has more mercury than canned light tuna.Therefore, when choosing your two food of fish and seafood, you can eat up to six ounces (an average meal) of albacore tuna per week.
  3. See local notices on the safety of fishing carried out by relatives and friends in lakes, rivers, and coastal areas. If there is no available information on such bodies of water in your area, you can eat up to six ounces (an average meal) per week of fish from local waters, but it does not consume any fish during the week.

Follow these recommendations when you feed your toddler with fish or seafood, but serve smaller portions.

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